MOVEMENT AND PERFORMANCE HEALTH SERVICES
Unit 1, 1A Tarrawanna Rd Corrimal NSW 2518
(Adjacent to Plus Fitness)
Call: 02 4283 6566
Email: info@movementandperformance.com.au
 
Physiotherapy  Services - Helping you to perform better at work, at home and in your sport
   Home            Know your body tissues - Tendon
 

WHAT IS IT?
Tendon


WHERE IS IT FOUND?
All around the body, connects muscles to bones.


WHAT IS IT MADE OF?
Connective tissue fibres. Very strong but with some degree of stretch (elasticity).


WHAT DOES IT DO?
Joins muscle to bone. Transmits the force generated by a muscle to a bone to either cause the bone to move (accelerate), stop a moving bone (decelerate) or to stabilise a bone or joint. A tendon can also store energy when it is stretched which is released when the tendon shortens. Via special receptors in the tendon tissue, the tendons can monitor tension in the muscles.


HOW IS IT INJURED?
Tendons are frequently injured when there is too much force applied to them on a repeated basis over a period of time. This can cause microtears, pain, inflammation and swelling and is called tendinitis. Tendons can also be injured by a sudden force causing overstretching of the tendon. This can result in stretching of the tendon fibres (Grade I injury), tearing of some (<50%) fibres (Grade II injury) or tearing of all the fibres (Grade III injury). Tendons are also subject to being cut when there are laceration injuries to the body.
As we age, tendons suffer degenerative changes and can become thinner and less elastic and have scar tissue and/or calcium deposits. These degenerated tendons are more subject to tearing.


HOW ARE INJURIES TREATED?
Initial treatment consists of RICE - rest from painful activity, Ice, Compression and Elevation.
Later treatment consists of:stretching exercises, strengthening exercises (especially eccentric strengthening exercises), review of training techniques /load, release of tight muscles.
Recent developments in the treatment of tendon injuries has suggested that the use of anti-fibrinoid medication may be beneficial.


HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO GET BETTER?
Grade I - up to 10 days
Grade II - 2 - 6 weeks
Grade III - 6 weeks to 6 months, surgery may be required.